Microchips to be inserted in copies of school exams as police investigate leaked A-level questions

Microchips to be inserted in school exam copies as police investigate leaked A-level math questions

  • Edexcel exam papers will be microchipped from this summer following the leak
  • Question from an A-level mathematics document released and released for sale online in 2017
  • Students offered exam answers for £ 300 the day before the test
  • 15 candidates disqualified as a result, police forwarded their investigation to prosecutors










Exam papers are due to be microchipped from this summer following a leaked A-level math exam on the eve of the test in 2017.

The Edexcel C4 A-level math article was leaked in a series of photographs for sale online with 15 applicants disqualified as a result.

Police investigating the source of the leak have now referred the case to prosecutors to press charges against the perpetrator, who is believed to be a student.

The Crown Prosecution Service must decide whether specific charges will be laid if the prosecution is successful – as this is the first such case.

To combat the potential leakage of this information via social media savvy students, Edexcel exam papers will now contain a microchip.

With the growth of sharing exam questions on social media between student groups has never been easier

The security initiative is being tested to allow Edexcel owner Pearson to track the location of each exam file, with an alert notifying the board if a review file is opened prematurely, reports The Telegraph .

It is hoped that this information will help locate and contain potential leaks before they occur.

Anyone found guilty of disclosing the documents could be charged with theft, if the review document was improperly obtained.

Leaked: The EdExcel math homework for A-Level students was distributed on the Internet the day before the exam

Leaked: The EdExcel math homework for A-Level students was distributed on the Internet the day before the exam

Pearson vice-president Derek Richardson yesterday sent a letter to principals explaining why the measure was necessary.

In the letter, obtained by The Telegraph, he wrote: “Security breaches can serve to significantly undermine trust.

The chairman of the examining board warned that individuals “were deliberately aiming to subvert our controls.”

AQA also suffered leaks with the contents of its GCSE chemistry paper leaked by a student before the exam last August.

Advertising


Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *